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Summer Institute

Discussions when the Content is Technical

1.

*Greenwald, B. “Teaching Technical Material, in C. R. Christiansen, D.A. Garvin and A. Sweet, eds. Education for Judgment: The Artistry of Discussion Leadership, Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1991.

  --Good overview of issues associated with teaching technical material, great suggestions on using cases.

4.

Sauter, P.  “Designing Discussion Activities to Achieve Desired Learning Outcomes:  Choices Using Mode of Delivery and Structure.”  Journal of Marketing Education, 2007, 29 (2), 122-131.

--A  well-reference piece on designing discussion activities that compares face-to-face and online discussions, and structured and unstructured discussion.  

2.

Brower, H. H. “On Emulating Classroom Discussion in a Distance-Delivered OBHR Course: Creating an On-Line Learning Community.”Academy of Management Learning & Education.2003,2(1): 22-36.

--Classifies four types of postings made by students: 1) direct response to question by instructor; 2)Asking a completely different question of a more technical nature; 3) Answering a question posed by a student; and 4) Responding to a comment made by a different student and building on that comment.

5.

Penny, L. and Murphy, E.  “Rubrics for Designing and Evaluating Online Asynchronous Discussions.”  British Journal of Educational Technology, 2009, 40 (5), 804-820.

 --Analyzed 50 rubrics which identified 153 performance criteria for online discussions.  Organized these criteria into four major categories: cognitive, mechanical, procedural/managerial and interactive.  Lots of samples included in the article.

3

Roehling, P. V., Kooi, T. L. V., Dykema, S., Quisenberry, B., and Vandlen, C.  “Engaging the Millenial Generation in Class Discussion." College Teaching, 2010, 59 (1), 1-6.

 --Identifies characteristics of millennial students and then explores how they can be engaged in discussion.